Training and Development: Safety and Health

Training and Development: Safety and Health

Training and Development: Safety and Health

1.Discuss three different ways that information is encoded in memory. Which of these three do you feel is the most relevant for safety training? Explain your choice.
Your response must be at least 200 words.

2.  Explain the principle of praxis as applied to adult learning. Provide an example of how it could be applied in a safety training class.
Your response must be at least 200 words.

3.  What are the four motivational strategies of the ARCS model? Which one do you think would be most important for a two-hour class on respiratory protection? Explain your choice.
Your response must be at least 200 words.

4.  Explain how external factors can influence behavior and learning. Provide two examples that illustrate your point.
Your response must be at least 200 words.

BOS 3751, Training and Development 1

Course Learning Outcomes for Unit III Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:

2. Examine safety and health training theories and their applications. 2.1 Discuss how cognitive, behavioral, and motivation theories can be used when developing

safety training. 2.2 Explain the importance of applying principles of andragogy when developing safety training.

 

Reading Assignment Chapter 4: Safety and Health Training Theories and Applications, pp.45-56 In order to access the resources below, you must first log into the myCSU Student Portal and access the Business Source Ultimate database within the CSU Online Library. Galbraith, D. D., & Fouch, S. E. (2007). Principles of adult learning.

Professional Safety, 52(9), 35-40. Ramsay, J., & Sorrell, E. (2007). Problem-based learning. Professional Safety, 52(9), 41-46. Navigate to and view the following videos: Caddell, A. (2011, March 30). Adult learning in under three minutes [Video file]. Retrieved from

https://youtu.be/8lvkJhXnEZk?list=PLW7_SctCBPmxkQr_T97eie8nGWGjqIFwD Caddell, A. (2013, May 24). Episode 2 adult learning in under 3 minutes [Video file]. Retrieved from

Unit Lesson

Safety Managers Dream About This Conversation

 

Click here to access a video.

What Joe and Jane may not realize is the reason the training was good is because it was designed with principles of adult learning in mind. In many organizations, safety training consists of a series of PowerPoint slides presented by a supervisor or safety professional. The presentations often encourage employees to “follow these rules and you won’t get hurt.” There may be a few graphic photos that illustrate what happens if you do not follow the rules.

Very little thought goes into how adults, or anyone for that matter, learn and retain information. We presume that they want to be safe, so they will listen and comply. When an accident happens, the conclusion often is that repeat training is needed. Why do we always think that repeating the same training will make any difference? Maybe we should examine how the training is presented. The problems are not unique to locally-developed training. Wilkins (2011) found that nearly half of the

UNIT III STUDY GUIDE

Safety and Health Training Theories

 

 

 

BOS 3751, Training and Development 2

UNIT x STUDY GUIDE

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construction workers who participated in Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) 10-Hour Construction Safety Training course thought the training was ineffective. Many found the course a waste of time and not relevant to their jobs. Some thought the trainers were incompetent. Application of adult learning theory is not evident in the course (Wilkins, 2011). The study raises serious questions about the value of generic training developed by outside organizations, such as OSHA.

Many employers use this type of training because it is easily accessible and, in their minds, demonstrates compliance with OSHA standards. After all, it is an OSHA-developed course. Important Learning Theories Cognitive theory deals with how the brain processes information and uses memory (Simmons, 2012). This theory can help us develop training strategies to help workers retain information. For example, in Joe’s Lockout/Tagout training, information was provided in small sections.

This enables short-term memory to connect with long-term memory.

Discussing personal experiences, connecting the training to previous knowledge, and hands-on practice are all important tactics that help the brain retain needed information. Group problem-solving exercises are also an excellent tactic for engaging cognitive learning (Ramsay & Sorrell, 2007). Behavioral theory describes how external factors influence learning (Simmons, 2012).

Positive reinforcement can be a powerful motivator. Joe’s boss noticing and commenting on the use of the lockout device on the Gizmo 3000 will provide an additional reason for Joe to comply with the requirements. Joe’s modeling of the use of the proper lockout procedures will be noticed and copied by other employees. Motivation theory provides a guide on how to design training that will motivate workers to want to learn and apply what they have learned.

The ARCS model describes four conditions that need to exist in order to motivate learners. (Simmons, 2012):

• Attention: What can be done to keep learners focused during the training? In Joe’s training, the mode of learning was changed frequently to keep the class from getting bored.

• Relevance: Does the training actually apply to what the workers do every day? If you work in an office, you might not have a need for Lockout/Tagout training. Joe used the procedures every day.

• Confidence: Do the learners leave the training believing that they can be successful in using what they learned? Joe was able to identify how to apply a lock to a new piece of equipment, and he was proud of it!

• Satisfaction: Does the training meet learners’ expectations? Did they enjoy being there? While we do not know what Joe’s expectations for the training were, we do know that he was pleased with how the course was presented and what he learned. After her discussion with Joe, Jane will be going into the class with expectations of a positive experience.

At this point, it should be clear that for safety training to be effective, it must be designed using sound learning theory with the target audience in mind.

This does not mean that “canned” courses like the ones available through OSHA should never be used, but they should be tailored by the instructor to meet local needs. In the next unit, we will continue to examine the different ways that adults learn and how to start to design relevant safety training.

References Ramsay, J., & Sorrell, E. (2007). Problem-based learning. Professional Safety, 52(9), 41-46. Simmons, P. (2012). Safety and health training theories and applications. In J. Haight (Ed.), Hazard

prevention through effective safety and health training (pp. 45-70). Des Plaines, IL: American Society of Safety Engineers.

Wilkins, J. R. (2011). Construction workers’ perceptions of health and safety training programmes.

Construction Management & Economics, 29(10), 1017-1026.

 

 

 

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UNIT x STUDY GUIDE

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Suggested Reading For more on construction workers’ perceptions of health and safety, please review the article below. In order to access the resource below, you must first log into the myCSU Student Portal and access the Business Source Ultimate database within the CSU Online Library. Wilkins, J. R. (2011). Construction workers’ perceptions of health and safety training programmes.

Construction Management & Economics, 29(10), 1017-1026.

Learning Activities (Nongraded) Go to the Construction Focus Four Training webpage on the OSHA website, and access the instructor guide for one of the four topics. Review the guide and other course materials for application of adult learning principles. Prepare an evaluation report that summarizes your findings and makes recommendations for improvement. Nongraded Learning Activities are provided to aid students in their course of study. You do not have to submit them. If you have questions, contact your instructor for further guidance and information.

 

 

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