INTEGRATING SOURCES IN THE TEXT

INTEGRATING SOURCES IN THE TEXT

INTEGRATING SOURCES IN THE TEXT OF YOUR PAPER

Choose three quotations from different parts of “Pale Horse, Pale Rider” and write paraphrases with  embedded partial quotations (Links to an external site.) of the three selections you choose. Format your assignment accordingly:

1. The original direct quotation in its entirety.

2. The paraphrased with embedded partial quotation.

Integrating Sources in the Text of Your Paper

As writers use facts, ideas, and quotations from the writing of others, they must integrate these into and within their own ideas. While it is important to cite your sources, it is also important that you integrate the information itself into your writing in an appropriate manner. The faulty integration of a source, even if the source is cited, can be considered plagiarism.

The following strategies for integrating sources in your paper are generally accepted by most writing and citation guidebooks. Each description includes a definition, an example of the strategy, as well as benefits and challenges involved in using the strategy. Examples of in-text citation on this page have been completed using APA citation style and have been created using an excerpt from Electric Rhetoric: Classical Rhetoric, Oralism, and a New Literacy by Kathleen E. Welch (1999).

Direct Quotation

Definition: The use of the exact words of the writer, often in complete sentences, surrounded by quotation marks.

Example:

Original Text:

“If writing is a tool, then it is part of the Cartesian dualistic reality in which we all continue to live. A tool is a thing out there in the world, a palpable object that one can store in the garage and retrieve as necessary. A tool can be put aside; language cannot.”

Direct Quotation of the Text:

“If writing is a tool, then it is part of the Cartesian dualistic reality in which we all continue to live. A tool is a thing out there in the world, a palpable object that one can store in the garage and retrieve as necessary” (Welch 1999, 145).

Benefit of using this strategy:

There is never any doubt that you have given credit to the source.

Challenge of using this strategy:  Essays with many examples of direct quoting are often thought of as being “choppy” or “lacking flow.”  The reason for this is that the words and ways of using language of so many others have been included in a a single text.  Therefore, direct quotation should be used in concert with other integration strategies.

Partial Direct Quotation (used to remove text from the middle of a quotation)

Definition: The use of a direct quotation in which a middle section of the quote has been removed. The text that has been directly quoted must be enclosed in quotation marks and the source must be cited.

Example:

Original Text:

“If writing is a tool, then it is part of the Cartesian dualistic reality in which we all continue to live. A tool is a thing out there in the world, a palpable object that one can store in the garage and retrieve as necessary. A tool can be put aside; language cannot.”

Partial Direct Quotation of the Text:

“If writing is a tool, then it is part of the Cartesian dualistic reality in which we all continue to live. A tool is a… palpable object that one can store in the garage and retrieve as necessary” (Welch 1999, 145).

Benefit of using this strategy: Removing a section from the middle of a quotation allows you to include the best and most pertinent part of the quotation in your essay.

Challenge of using this strategy: The point where a quotation is stopped and restarted should make a smooth connection so that the quote is clear for your reader.

INTEGRATING SOURCES

INTEGRATING SOURCES